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About

About

José Villar was born in 1967 in Madrid. He received the degree in Electronic Engineering in 1991 and his Ph.D in 1997 from the School of Industrial Engineering-ICAI at the Universidad Pontificia Comillas, Madrid, Spain. From 1997 to 2017 he was Researcher at the Instituto de Investigación Tecnológica-IIT (Institute for Research in Technology) of ICAI and Deputy Director of IIT from 2004 to 2016, and was Senior Associate Professor at the ICAI Electronic and Communications Department, and member of the Doctorate Academic Comission of Comillas University from 2013 to 2017.

José Villar is currently Senior Researcher at INESC TEC in its Center for Power and Energy Systems.

He has participated in more than 50 research projects with industry and administrations, coordinating more than 20, and his co-author of more than 20 papers in International Journals (most JCR indexed) and more than 60 papers in international conferences.

His current areas of interest include operation and strategic planning of power systems, electrical vehicles, renewable generation, distributed generation and smart cities, soft computing and data mining.

Interest
Topics
Details

Details

  • Name

    José Villar
  • Cluster

    Power and Energy
  • Role

    Senior Researcher
  • Since

    01st September 2016
Publications

2018

Flexibility products and markets: Literature review

Authors
Villar, J; Bessa, R; Matos, M;

Publication
ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS RESEARCH

Abstract
This paper reviews flexibility products and flexibility markets, currently being discussed or designed to help in the operation of power systems under their evolving environment. This evolution is characterized by the increase of renewable generation and distributed energy resources (including distributed generation, self-consumption, demand response and electric vehicles). The paper is an attempt to review and classify flexibility products considering its main attributes such as scope, purpose, location or provider, and to summarize some of the main approaches to flexibility markets designs and implementations. Main current literature gaps and most promising research lines for future work are also identified.

2017

Towards a simplified approach for modeling policymaker's decisions in the power sector

Authors
Domenech, S; Villar, J; Campos, FA; Rivier, M;

Publication
International Conference on the European Energy Market, EEM

Abstract
Plenty of literature exists about how to model liberalized electricity generation markets for the medium and long terms, contributing to the analyze and understanding of those markets, helping companies to plan cost-efficient shortterm market strategies and/or long-term generation capacity investments, and supporting regulators and policymakers in policy decisions and market designs. However, those models do not explicitly consider the impact on investment decisions, mix of technologies and wholesale market prices; of policy decisions but as an external passive input to the model. This paper reviews existing approaches to model policy decisions in such a context, and provides a theoretical modeling framework that explicitly considers the interaction of policymakers' decisions with the generation investment and operation, and customers' response in a liberalized power system. Such kind of model, based on bi-level optimization, contributes to the longterm assessment of some policy decisions in the electricity sector. © 2017 IEEE.

2017

Estimation of the Spanish secondary reserves requirements

Authors
Villar, J; Campos, FA; Domenech, S; Diaz, CA;

Publication
International Conference on the European Energy Market, EEM

Abstract
The increasing penetration of Intermittent Generation (IG) is being accompanied by the revision of the needs of traditional regulation reserves, as well as the discussion of new flexibility products for system balancing. In the context of electricity generation models, it is of high relevance to adequately represent, not only the energy, but also the reserve dispatch constraints, by providing the models with the expected secondary reserve requirements (SRR), so as to output more realistic energy and reserve schedules and prices. This paper analyses the SRR published by the Spanish System Operator and uses several forecasting tools for determining its main explanatory variables. Results confirm that the SRR have remained almost constant during the years of significant IG growth (and even slightly decreasing in the most recent years), and that the best SRR estimation models found use the demand and its inter-hour variations as the main explanatory variables, but not wind productions as could be expected. © 2017 IEEE.

2017

Endogenous secondary reserves requirements in long-term electricity generation models

Authors
Campos, FA; Domenech, S; Villar, J;

Publication
International Conference on the European Energy Market, EEM

Abstract
Secondary Reserve Requirements (SRR) are usually estimated based upon unit failure rates, and demand and intermittent productions forecasting errors. These requirements are very often inputs to energy and reserve generation dispatch models. However, for the long term, the fact that renewable generation investments must also be computed, affects these requirements. This paper proposes a new Unit Commitment (UC) to represent the SRR in long-term electricity generation models as a function of the renewable investment decisions. Specifically, SRRs are computed as a function of the forecasting errors of renewable productions, and of the unavailability rates of the generation units, which are also outputs of the UC. The case studies show that, when SRRs are endogenous, investments in renewable generation can be lower than expected due to the additional reserve costs these technologies involve. © 2017 IEEE.

2017

Advanced scoring method of eco-efficiency in European cities

Authors
Moutinho, V; Madaleno, M; Robaina, M; Villar, J;

Publication
Environmental Science and Pollution Research

Abstract
This paper analyzes a set of selected German and French cities’ performance in terms of the relative behavior of their eco-efficiencies, computed as the ratio of their gross domestic product (GDP) over their CO2 emissions. For this analysis, eco-efficiency scores of the selected cities are computed using the data envelopment analysis (DEA) technique, taking the eco-efficiencies as outputs, and the inputs being the energy consumption, the population density, the labor productivity, the resource productivity, and the patents per inhabitant. Once DEA results are analyzed, the Malmquist productivity indexes (MPI) are used to assess the time evolution of the technical efficiency, technological efficiency, and productivity of the cities over the window periods 2000 to 2005 and 2005 to 2008. Some of the main conclusions are that (1) most of the analyzed cities seem to have suboptimal scales, being one of the causes of their inefficiency; (2) there is evidence that high GDP over CO2 emissions does not imply high eco-efficiency scores, meaning that DEA like approaches are useful to complement more simplistic ranking procedures, pointing out potential inefficiencies at the input levels; (3) efficiencies performed worse during the period 2000–2005 than during the period 2005–2008, suggesting the possibility of corrective actions taken during or at the end of the first period but impacting only on the second period, probably due to an increasing environmental awareness of policymakers and governors; and (4) MPI analysis shows a positive technological evolution of all cities, according to the general technological evolution of the reference cities, reflecting a generalized convergence of most cities to their technological frontier and therefore an evolution in the right direction. © 2017 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany

Supervised
thesis

2018

Energy management in smart cities

Author
Christian Francisco Calvillo Muñoz

Institution
Outra