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About

I studied Astronomy in a 4-years 1st degree (FCUP-UP, 1998) followed by a master degree in computational methods (FEUP-UP, 2000) and a PhD in Surveying Engineering (UP, 2006) [Thesis: Sea level change in the North Atlantic from tide gauges and satellite altimetry]. After a postdoc in Israel where I worked on the analysis of radon time series I became interested on the use of radon gas as a geophysical proxy and as a tracer of dynamic processes in the Earth's system.

I edited a book on "Nonlinear Time Series Analysis in the Geosciences - Applications in Climatology, Geodynamics and Solar-Terrestrial Physics", and 3 topical volumes. I'm the author of 3 book chapters and 50 papers in international peer-reviewed journals.

 

My research is highly interdisciplinary, with a strong emphasis on data science, particularly time series analysis of environmental data. I have expertise on the analysis of climate records and satellite data, focusing on the assessment and quantification of climate change (trends, changes in seasonality, extremes). I have also experience on the field monitoring of environmental radioactivity (in soil, air and water) and on the analysis and interpretation of radiation variability in the context of Sun-Earth interactions as well as interactions between the different sub-components of the Earth's system.

Interest
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Publications

2020

The Structure of Climate Variability Across Scales

Authors
Franzke, CLE; Barbosa, S; Blender, R; Fredriksen, HB; Laepple, T; Lambert, F; Nilsen, T; Rypdal, K; Rypdal, M; Scotto, MG; Vannitsem, S; Watkins, NW; Yang, LC; Yuan, NM;

Publication
Reviews of Geophysics

Abstract

2020

Ambient radioactivity and atmospheric electric field: A joint study in an urban environment

Authors
Barbosa, S;

Publication
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity

Abstract
Ambient radioactivity and atmospheric electricity are inextricably linked phenomena. In order to assess the role of ambient radioactivity in the local variability of the atmospheric electric field at an urban site, simultaneous measurements of radon concentration, gamma radiation, and atmospheric electric field are carried out in the city of Porto, Portugal. Both radon and gamma radiation display an average daily cycle peaking before sunrise, but with considerable variability from day to day, particularly in amplitude. The atmospheric electric field displays a daily cycle with a minimum at dawn and maximum in the early afternoon, as well as a secondary peak in the early morning. The temporal variation of the daily patterns is analysed by means of an empirical orthogonal function analysis, and related to local meteorological parameters. The variability of the local atmospheric electric field is mainly determined by aerosol transport and accumulation close to the surface associated with local meteorological conditions and atmospheric stability rather than by conductivity variations associated with ambient radioactivity. © 2020 Elsevier Ltd

2020

Morphological controls and statistical modelling of boulder transport by extreme storms

Authors
Oliveira, MA; Scotto, MG; Barbosa, S; de Andrade, CF; Freitas, MD;

Publication
Marine Geology

Abstract

2020

Vertical land motion in the Iberian Atlantic coast and its implications for sea level change evaluation

Authors
Mendes, VB; Barbosa, SM; Carinhas, D;

Publication
JOURNAL OF APPLIED GEODESY

Abstract
In this study, we estimate vertical land motion for 35 stations primarily located along the coastline of Portugal and Spain, using GPS time series with at least eight years of observations. Based on this set of GPS stations, our results show that vertical land motion along the Iberian coastline is characterized, in general, by a low to moderate subsidence, ranging from -2.2 mm yr(-1) to 0.4 mm yr(-1), partially explained by the glacial isostatic adjustment geophysical signal. The estimates of vertical land motion are subsequently applied in the analysis of tide gauge records and compared with geocentric estimates of sea level change. Geocentric sea level for the Iberian Atlantic coast determined from satellite altimetry for the last three decades has a mean of 2.5 +/- 0.6 mm yr(-1), with a significant range, as seen for a subset of grid points located in the vicinity of tide gauge stations, which present trends varying from 1.5 mm yr(-1) to 3.2 mm yr(-1). Relative sea level determined from tide gauges for this region shows a high degree of spatial variability, that can be partially explained not only by the difference in length and quality of the time series, but also for possible undocumented datum shifts, turning some trends unreliable. In general, tide gauges corrected for vertical land motion produce smaller trends than satellite altimetry. Tide gauge trends for the last three decades not corrected for vertical land motion range from 0.3 mm yr(-1) to 5.0 mm yr(-1) with a mean of 2.6 +/- 1.4 mm yr(-1), similar to that obtained from satellite altimetry. When corrected for vertical land motion, we observe a reduction of the mean to E1.9 +/- 1.4 mm yr(-1). Actions to improve our knowledge of vertical land motion using space geodesy, such as establishing stations in co-location with tide gauges, will contribute to better evaluate sea level change and its impacts on coastal regions.

2020

The Impact of Atmospheric and Tectonic Constraints on Radon-222 and Carbon Dioxide Flow in Geological Porous Media - A Dozen-Year Research Summary

Authors
Zafrir, H; Barbosa, S; Levintal, E; Weisbrod, N; Ben Horin, Y; Zalevsky, Z;

Publication
Frontiers in Earth Science

Abstract