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Publications

2019

Prototyping and Programming a Multipurpose Educational Mobile Robot - NaSSIE

Authors
Pinto, VH; Monteiro, JM; Gonçalves, J; Costa, P;

Publication
Robotics in Education - Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing

Abstract

2019

Prototyping and Analysis of Comfort in Driving a Bicycle Equipped with a Magneto-Rheological Damper

Authors
Pascoal, A; Gonçalves, J;

Publication
2019 IEEE 6th Portuguese Meeting on Bioengineering (ENBENG)

Abstract

2019

Semi-Active Vibration Control of a Non-Collocated Civil Structure Using Evolutionary-Based BELBIC

Authors
Cesar, MB; Coelho, JP; Goncalves, J;

Publication
Actuators

Abstract
A buildings resilience to seismic activity can be increased by providing ways for the structure to dynamically counteract the effect of the Earth’s crust movements. This ability is fundamental in certain regions of the globe, where earthquakes are more frequent, and can be achieved using different strategies. State-of-the-art anti-seismic buildings have, embedded on their structure, mostly passive actuators such as base isolation, Tuned Mass Dampers (TMD) and viscous dampers that can be used to reduce the effect of seismic or even wind induced vibrations. The main disadvantage of this type of building vibration reduction strategies concerns their inability to adapt their properties in accordance to both the excitation signal or structural behaviour. This adaption capability can be promoted by adding to the building active type actuators operating under a closed-loop. However, these systems are substantially larger than passive type solutions and require a considerable amount of energy that may not be available during a severe earthquake due to power grid failure. An intermediate solution between these two extremes is the introduction of semi-active actuators such as magneto–rheological dampers. The inclusion of magneto–rheological actuators is among one of the most promising semi-active techniques. However, the overall performance of this strategy depends on several aspects such as the actuators number and location within the structure and the vibration sensors network. It can be the case where the installation leads to a non-collocated system which presents additional challenges to control. This paper proposes to tackle the problem of controlling the vibration of a non-collocated three-storey building by means of a brain–emotional controller tuned using an evolutionary algorithm. This controller will be used to adjust the stiffness coefficient of a magneto–rheological actuator such that the building’s frame oscillation under earthquake excitation, is mitigated. The obtained results suggest that, using this control strategy, it is possible to reduce the building vibration to secure levels.

2019

A line follower educational mobile robot performance robustness increase using a competition as benchmark

Authors
Goncalves, J; Pinto, VH; Costa, P;

Publication
2019 6th International Conference on Control, Decision and Information Technologies, CoDIT 2019

Abstract
In this paper it is presented a line follower educational mobile robot performance robustness increase. The Robotic Day line Follower Competition was used as a Benchmark to test the proposed approach. The applied robot is based on an Arduino, which is applied in the low level control, while the high level control loop is carried out by an RPI running an object pascal application. The described robot was prototyped in order to have a competitive participation in the Robotic Day Line Follower 2017 competition, and improved for performance robustness increase in order to participate in the 2018 competition. It was prototyped with an RPI, taking advantage of its capabilities, allowing the use of higher performance sensors, when compared with the most common standard approaches based on a single 8 bit RISC micro-controller, having as disadvantage the inevitable robot size increase, which compromises in certain situations the robot maneuverability and increases the power consumption. The robot is equipped with DC Motors, the chosen line follower sensor is the picamera and for the obstacle detection, a time of flight sensor was applied. © 2019 IEEE.

2019

Introduction to DC motors for engineering students based on laboratory experiments

Authors
Pinto, VH; Goncalves, JA; Costa, P;

Publication
2019 6th International Conference on Control, Decision and Information Technologies, CoDIT 2019

Abstract
Since DC Motors are common components in engineering projects that involve process control, it is necessary for any student in this area to understand their concepts, construction and applications. This paper focuses on a series of Laboratory Experiments that were carried out in an Entry Level Unit of the Integrated Master Degree in Electrical and Computers Engineering of the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto, named Project FEUP. In this class, mandatory for all students, they learn to how use these motors, from basic concepts to the estimation modeling. The paper presents the developed kits that students use, the simplified model and examples of the experiments performed in some classes. © 2019 IEEE.