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About

About

Recently graduated in Bioengineering, I am passionate by hi-tech and R&D. Always trying to contribute for a better understanding of human body physiology applying engineering concepts. My electronic and computer science skills acquired during my Master Degree and external projects, endorsed my capabilities as a researcher in biomedical engineering area. Signal and image processing, Programming, Electronics, Instrumentation, Automation, Data structure, Bionics and Computer-aided Systems were some of the most relevant areas lectured during my graduation, all of them related to biomedical science.
My experience enables me to developed and produce new technologies with real-life applications to improve healthcare and human well-being

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Details

Details

001
Publications

2018

Cognitive impact and psychophysiological effects of stress using a biomonitoring platform

Authors
Rodrigues, S; Paiva, JS; Dias, D; Aleixo, M; Filipe, RM; Cunha, JPS;

Publication
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Abstract
Stress can impact multiple psychological and physiological human domains. In order to better understand the effect of stress on cognitive performance, and whether this effect is related to an autonomic response to stress, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was used as a testing platform along with a 2-Choice Reaction Time Task. When considering the nature and importance of Air Traffic Controllers (ATCs) work and the fact that they are subjected to high levels of stress, this study was conducted with a sample of ATCs (n = 11). Linear Heart Rate Variability (HRV) features were extracted from ATCs electrocardiogram (ECG) acquired using a medical-grade wearable ECG device (Vital Jacket® (1-Lead, Biodevices S.A, Matosinhos, Portugal)). Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) were also used to measure perceived stress. TSST produced statistically significant changes in some HRV parameters (Average of normal-to-normal intervals (AVNN), Standard Deviation of all NN (SDNN), root mean square of differences between successive rhythm-to-rhythm (RR) intervals (RMSSD), pNN20, and LF/HF) and subjective measures of stress, which recovered after the stress task. Although these short-term changes in HRV showed a tendency to normalize, an impairment on cognitive performance was evident. Despite that participant’s reaction times were lower, the accuracy significantly decreased, presenting more errors after performing the acute stress event. Results can also point to the importance of the development of quantified occupational health (qOHealth) devices to allow for the monitoring of stress responses. © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

2018

A Wearable System for the Stress Monitoring of Air Traffic Controllers During An Air Traffic Control Refresher Training and the Trier Social Stress Test: A Comparative Study

Authors
Rodrigues, S; Paiva, JS; Dias, D; Aleixo, M; Filipe, R; Cunha, JPS;

Publication
The Open Bioinformatics Journal

Abstract

2018

Wearable health devices—vital sign monitoring, systems and technologies

Authors
Dias, D; Silva Cunha, JPS;

Publication
Sensors

Abstract
Wearable Health Devices (WHDs) are increasingly helping people to better monitor their health status both at an activity/fitness level for self-health tracking and at a medical level providing more data to clinicians with a potential for earlier diagnostic and guidance of treatment. The technology revolution in the miniaturization of electronic devices is enabling to design more reliable and adaptable wearables, contributing for a world-wide change in the health monitoring approach. In this paper we review important aspects in the WHDs area, listing the state-of-the-art of wearable vital signs sensing technologies plus their system architectures and specifications. A focus on vital signs acquired by WHDs is made: first a discussion about the most important vital signs for health assessment using WHDs is presented and then for each vital sign a description is made concerning its origin and effect on heath, monitoring needs, acquisition methods and WHDs and recent scientific developments on the area (electrocardiogram, heart rate, blood pressure, respiration rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood glucose, skin perspiration, capnography, body temperature, motion evaluation, cardiac implantable devices and ambient parameters). A general WHDs system architecture is presented based on the state-of-the-art. After a global review of WHDs, we zoom in into cardiovascular WHDs, analysing commercial devices and their applicability versus quality, extending this subject to smart t-shirts for medical purposes. Furthermore we present a resumed evolution of these devices based on the prototypes developed along the years. Finally we discuss likely market trends and future challenges for the emerging WHDs area. © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

2018

Psychophysiological Stress Assessment Among On-Duty Firefighters

Authors
Rodrigues, S; Dias, D; Paiva, JS; Cunha, JPS;

Publication
2018 40th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC)

Abstract

2018

Stress among on-duty firefighters: an ambulatory assessment study

Authors
Rodrigues, S; Paiva, JS; Dias, D; Paulo, J;

Publication
PeerJ

Abstract
Background Stress at work has been broadly acknowledged as a worldwide problem and has been the focus of concern for many researchers. Firefighting, in particular, is frequently reported as a highly stressful occupation. In order to investigate firefighters’ occupational health in terms of stress events, perceptions, symptoms, and physiological reactions under real-world conditions, an ambulatory assessment protocol was developed. Methods Seventeen firefighters’ cardiac signal was continuously monitored during an average of three shifts within a working week with medical clinically certified equipment (VitalJacket®), which allows for continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) and actigraphy measurement. Psychological data were collected with a software application running on smartphones, collecting potential stressful events, stress symptoms, and stress appraisal. Results A total of 450.56 h of medical-quality ECG were collected, and heart rate variability (HRV) analysis was performed. Findings suggest that although ‘fire’ situations are more common, ‘accidents’ are more stressful. Additionally, firefighters showed high levels of physiological stress (based on AVNN and LF/HF HRV metrics) when compared to normative healthy population values that may not be diagnosed using merely self-reports. Discussion The proposed ambulatory study seems to be useful for the monitoring of stress levels and its potential impact on health of first responders. Additionally, it could also be an important tool for the design and implementation of efficient interventions and informed management resolutions in real time. Potential applications of this research include the development of quantified occupational health (qOHealth) devices for real life monitoring of emergency personnel stress reactions.