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About

About

I was born at Funchal in Madeira Island (Portugal) and have finished a Master in Multimedia Technology (2008) in Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto (FEUP) and a degree in Systems and Computers Engineering (2001) from the University of Madeira (UMa). Since 2010, I'm Ph.D student. in Digital Media at FEUP and developing his research within Graphics, Interaction and Gaming (GIG) at Department of Informatics Engineering of FEUP. My PhD research treat training and certification through game-based learning, particularly serious games.

In recent years I have collaborated in several research projects (National, European and International) as research fellow in Graphics, Interaction and Gaming (GIG) of the Informatics Department of FEUP and in the Center of Information Systems and Computer Graphics at INESCTEC (ERAS (FCT), ICARUS (FP7), New Tools for Certification in Game-based Learning (IC2-Austin/US).

I lecture at FEUP and Faculty of Arts of the University of Porto(FLUP), and more recently I have started a collaboration with the company GISGEO in the area of R & D in geographic information tools (GIS) and geolocation.

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Details

Details

  • Name

    Ricardo José Baptista
  • Cluster

    Computer Science
  • Role

    Affiliated Researcher
  • Since

    05th April 2013
Publications

2016

Relation Between Game Genres and Competences for In-Game Certification

Authors
Baptista, R; Coelho, A; de Carvalho, CV;

Publication
SERIOUS GAMES, INTERACTION, AND SIMULATION, SGAMES 2015

Abstract
Digital Games can be effective as learning tools, in applications that can be designated as Serious Games (SG), Games for Learning (GL) or Games-based learning (GBL). SG provide challenges in accordance with the intended learning objectives and can adapt and/or repeat (by allowing error recovering) them according to the learner's level. In training, this aspect is decisive in the acquisition of knowledge, experience and professional skills. The effectiveness of games-based training is directly related to the success on how the challenges promote the acquisition of skills, for which there is no optimal design methodology. This paper presents how a study that identifies the most appropriate game genres to develop specific skills and competences can be used to provide initial solutions to serious games design methodologies. The Triadic Certification model combines the competences defined for each training plan with the challenges designed for the serious games on a matrix that matches the needs and levels.

2015

Relationship Between Game Categories and Skills Development: Contributions for Serious Game Design

Authors
Baptista, R; Coelho, A; de Carvalho, CV;

Publication
PROCEEDINGS OF THE 9TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON GAMES BASED LEARNING (ECGBL 2015)

Abstract
Recently, Serious Games (SG) achieved a recognized position as a learning tool in several contexts. SG provide constructive learning environments in which errors can be made without real life penalties and where students get instant feedback from their actions when facing challenges. These challenges should be in accordance with the intended learning goals and they should adapt and/or be repeated according to the learner's level. This aspect is decisive in the acquisition of knowledge, experience and professional skills through the simulation of different situations and contexts. The effectiveness of competences' training is directly related to the success in their acquisition but, above all, it is related to the ability to apply them to successfully perform a given task. However, an optimal game design methodology for competence training is yet to be created. This article presents a study that identifies the most appropriate game categories to develop specific skills and competences. It considers a taxonomy with eight game categories (Action, Strategy, Playing, Sports, Management Simulation, Adventure, Puzzle and Quiz) that were matched with the Education Competences and Educational Competency Wheel. Analysing 116 serious games allowed identifying which categories were more efficient in the training of a specific competence and therefore should be reused in the same scope.

2015

LOCATION-BASED TOURISM IN-GAME CERTIFICATION

Authors
Baptista, R; Nobrega, R; Coelho, A; Vaz de Carvalho, CV;

Publication
INTED2015: 9TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE

Abstract
Serious games are starting to attain a higher role as learning tools in several and diversified contexts such as education and training. Serious games provide a favorable learning environment where mistakes can occur without real life penalty and students get instant feedback from challenges. The rules, behavior simulation, and feedback from the player's actions of the studied games, provide a realistic context for learning where failure and repetition can be a positive contribution to achieve success. These challenges are designed in accordance with the intended learning objectives and will self-adapt and repeat according to the student difficulty level while providing instant feedback. There is decisively an acquisition of knowledge and experience through: (1) motivating and engaging environments, (2) approaches to problem solving and simulation of different situations, and also, (3) from contexts where players can develop professional skills. However, how do we certify acquired knowledge and competencies? Until now, most research has been focused on the evaluation of the game itself rather than on the learners' assessment. The analysis of the player is usually performed at the end of the game using traditional questionnaire forms. Instead of that, using our Correlation Matrix methodology [15], we provide a set of guidelines for game designers to build specific games for the certification of competences, and an in-game assessment in location-based cultural heritage applications. This assessment can be done with in-game mechanics and challenges providing a learning path to obtain the intended competences. These guidelines are established on a triad of components: Competencies/Mechanics/Play, following the approach of Casper Harteveld (Play/Meaning/Reality) [19]. This is needed for balancing the relationship between the game mechanics for serious games genres, the array of competences to certify, and the game elements. This paper presents a matrix of generic skills, based on the Education Competences [12] which serves as a reference to identify which competencies must be used to obtain the performance success of each situation. Based on the combination of identified competencies and the training game genres, this choice allows the identification of the most appropriate and necessary mechanics and challenges by comparison with a correlation matrix between competencies and game genre analysis with 120 serious games. Currently this methodology is being applied in the context of tourism guide's applications with the key objective of identifying ability patterns correlated in acquiring different skills (multiplex). In the tourism guide's context these skills could be planning and organizing the city exploration through challenges and targets to achieve, and successful assess heritage knowledge by quizzes or photos taken. As a result, existing game mechanics are identified and new ones are created and implemented in a Location-Based Gaming (LBG) platform to support more learning and to better interact with the heritage sites. As a case study the guidelines will be applied to a tourism mobile route application, about Porto heritage, to provide an improved design so that it may also be capable of in-game certification of tourism guides.

2014

A game for robot operation training in Search and Rescue missions

Authors
Goncalves, R; Baptista, R; Coelho, A; Matos, A; de Carvalho, CV; Bedkowski, J; Musialik, P; Ostrowski, I; Majek, K;

Publication
2014 11TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON REMOTE ENGINEERING AND VIRTUAL INSTRUMENTATION (REV)

Abstract
Search and rescue (SAR) teams often face several complex and dangerous tasks, which could be aided by unmanned robotic vehicles (UV). UV agents can potentially be used to decrease the risk in the loss of lives both of the rescuers and victims and aid in the search and transportation of survivors and in the removal of debris in a catastrophe scenario. Depending on the nature of a catastrophe and its geographical location, there are potentially three types of UVs that can be deployed: aerial, surface and ground. Due to the control and manipulation particularities each type of UV contemplates, their operators need prior training and certification. To train and certify the operators a tool (serious game) is under development. In this paper we will make an overview about our approach in its development. This game uses a typical client-server architecture where all client agents (virtual UVs and operator client interfaces) share the same immersive virtual environment which is generated through the merging of GIS data and a semantic model extracted from 3D laser data. There will be several types of scenarios suitable to several types of catastrophe situations. Each of these scenarios has its own mission plan for the trainees to follow. The game will also provide an interface for mission planning so that each mission plan will be carefully designed to accurately correspond to a matrix of skills. This matrix lists a set of common skills in various different UV operational case studies which will allow the certification of operators.

2014

Training and support system in the cloud for improving the situational awareness in Search and Rescue (SAR) operations

Authors
Pelka, M; Majek, K; Bedkowski, J; Musialik, P; Maslowski, A; De Cubber, G; Balta, H; Coelho, A; Goncalves, R; Baptista, R; Sanchez, JM; Govindaraj, S;

Publication
12th IEEE International Symposium on Safety, Security and Rescue Robotics, SSRR 2014 - Symposium Proceedings

Abstract
In this paper, a Training and Support system for Search and Rescue operations is described. The system is a component of the ICARUS project (http://www.fp7-icarus.eu) which has a goal to develop sensor, robotic and communication technologies for Human Search And Rescue teams. The support system for planning and managing complex SAR operations is implemented as a command and control component that integrates different sources of spatial information, such as maps of the affected area, satellite images and sensor data coming from the unmanned robots, in order to provide a situation snapshot to the rescue team who will make the necessary decisions. Support issues will include planning of frequency resources needed for given areas, prediction of coverage conditions, location of fixed communication relays, etc. The training system is developed for the ICARUS operators controlling UGVs (Unmanned Ground Vehicles), UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) and USVs (Unmanned Surface Vehicles) from a unified Remote Control Station (RC2). The Training and Support system is implemented in SaaS model (Software as a Service). Therefore, its functionality is available over the Ethernet. SAR ICARUS teams from different countries can be trained simultaneously on a shared virtual stage. In this paper we will show the multi-robot 3D mapping component (aerial vehicle and ground vehicles). We will demonstrate that these 3D maps can be used for Training purpose. Finally we demonstrate current approach for ICARUS Urban SAR (USAR) and Marine SAR (MSAR) operation training. © 2014 IEEE.