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About

My name is Susana Rodrigues and I am a researcher in the area of occupational health at BRAIN group. I hold a PhD degree in Psychology from Faculdade de Psicologia e Ciências da Educação da Universidade do Porto (FPCEUP) and I am a Chartered Psychologist with Ordem de Psicologos, with a specialization in clinical and health psychology. So far my research has concentrated in the areas of stress, fatigue, coping and engagement among different occupational groups using multi-methods and novel wearable devices.

Interest
Topics
Details

Details

  • Name

    Susana Cristina Rodrigues
  • Role

    Assistant Researcher
  • Since

    01st October 2014
  • Nationality

    Portugal
  • Service

    Human Resources
  • Contacts

    +351222094106
    susana.c.rodrigues@inesctec.pt
001
Publications

2022

Does the type of seizure influence heart rate variability changes?

Authors
Faria, MT; Rodrigues, S; Campelo, M; Dias, D; Rego, R; Rocha, H; Sa, F; Tavares Silva, M; Pinto, R; Pestana, G; Oliveira, A; Pereira, J; Cunha, JPS; Rocha Goncalves, F; Goncalves, H; Martins, E;

Publication
Epilepsy and Behavior

Abstract
Objective: Heart rate variability (HRV), an index of the autonomic cardiac activity, is decreased in patients with epilepsy, and a low HRV is associated with a higher risk of sudden death. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures are one of the most consistent risk factors for SUDEP, but the influence (and relative risk) of each type of seizure on cardiac function is still unknown. Our objective was to assess the impact of the type of seizure (focal to bilateral tonic-clonic seizure – FBTCS – versus non-FBTCS) on periictal HRV, in a group of patients with refractory epilepsy and both types of seizures. Methods: We performed a 48-hour Holter recording on 121 patients consecutively admitted to our Epilepsy Monitoring Unit. We only included patients with both FBTCS and non-FBTCS on the Holter recording and selected the first seizure of each type to analyze. To evaluate HRV parameters (AVNN, SDNN, RMSSD, pNN20, LF, HF, and LF/HF), we chose 5-min epochs pre- and postictally. Results: We included 14 patients, with a median age of 36 (min–max, 16–55) years and 64% were female. Thirty-six percent had cardiovascular risk factors, but no previously known cardiac disease. In the preictal period, there were no statistically significant differences in HRV parameters, between FBTCS and non-FBTCS. In the postictal period, AVNN, RMSSD, pNN20, LF, and HF were significantly lower, and LF/HF and HR were significantly higher in FBTCS. From preictal to postictal periods, FBTCS elicited a statistically significant rise in HR and LF/HF, and a statistically significant fall in AVNN, RMSSD, pNN20, and HF. Non-FBTCS only caused statistically significant changes in HR (decrease) and AVNN (increase). Significance/conclusion: This work emphasizes the greater effect of FBTCS in autonomic cardiac function in patients with refractory epilepsy, compared to other types of seizures, with a significant reduction in vagal tonus, which may be associated with an increased risk of SUDEP. © 2021 Elsevier Inc.

2021

A systematic review on the use of immersive virtual reality to train professionals

Authors
Narciso, D; Melo, M; Rodrigues, S; Cunha, JP; Vasconcelos Raposo, J; Bessa, M;

Publication
MULTIMEDIA TOOLS AND APPLICATIONS

Abstract
The main goal of this systematic review is to synthesize existing evidence on the use of immersive virtual reality (IVR) to train professionals as well as to identify the main gaps and challenges that still remain and need to be addressed by future research. Following a comprehensive search, 66 documents were identified, assessed for relevance, and analysed. The main areas of application of IVR-based training were identified. Moreover, we identified the stimuli provided, the hardware used and information regarding training evaluation. The results showed that the areas in which a greater number of works were published were those related to healthcare and elementary occupations. In hardware, the most commonly used equipment was head mounted displays (HMDs), headphones included in the HMDs and handheld controllers. Moreover, the results indicated that IVR training systems are often evaluated manually, the most common metric being questionnaires applied before and after the experiment, and that IVR training systems have a positive effect in training professionals. We conclude that the literature is insufficient for determining the effect of IVR in the training of professionals. Although some works indicated promising results, there are still relevant themes that must be explored and limitations to overcome before virtual training replaces real-world training.

2021

Heart rate variability in patients with refractory epilepsy: The influence of generalized convulsive seizures

Authors
Faria, MT; Rodrigues, S; Campelo, M; Dias, D; Rego, R; Rocha, H; Sa, F; Tavares Silva, M; Pinto, R; Pestana, G; Oliveira, A; Pereira, J; Cunha, JPS; Rocha Goncalves, F; Goncalves, H; Martins, E;

Publication
Epilepsy Research

Abstract

2021

Implementing a Quantified Occupational Health Sensing Platform in the Aviation Sector: an Exploratory Study in Routine Air Traffic Control Work Shifts

Authors
Rodrigues, S; Dias, D; Aleixo, M; Retorta, A; Cunha, JPS;

Publication
2021 43rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

Abstract

2020

Impact of Different Stimuli on User Stress During a Virtual Firefighting Training Exercise

Authors
Narciso, D; Melo, M; Rodrigues, S; Cunha, JPS; Bessa, M;

Publication
20th IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Bioengineering, BIBE 2020, Cincinnati, OH, USA, October 26-28, 2020

Abstract
Training firefighters using Virtual Reality (VR) technology brings several benefits over traditional training methods including the reduction of costs and risks. The ability of causing the same level of stress as a real situation so that firefighters can learn how to deal with stress was investigated. An experiment aiming to study the influence that additional stimuli (heat, weight, smell and using personal protective equipment-PPE) have on user's stress level while performing a Virtual Environment (VE) designed to train firefighters was developed. Participants' stress and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) were obtained from electrocardiograms recorded during the experiment. The results suggest that wearing the PPE has the largest impact on user's stress level. The results also showed that HRV was able to evidence differences between two phases of the experiment, which suggests that it can be used to monitor users' quantified reaction to VEs. © 2020 IEEE.