Cookies Policy
The website need some cookies and similar means to function. If you permit us, we will use those means to collect data on your visits for aggregated statistics to improve our service. Find out More
Accept Reject
  • Menu
About
Download Photo HD

About

I was born in Portugal in 1964. I graduated in mathematics from the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Porto and earned a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the same institution.
My current position is auxiliary professor at the Computer Science department of the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Porto. I am also affiliated with the Center for Research in Advanced Computing Systems (CRACS), an R&D unit of INESCTEC Research Laboratory, where I am an effective member.
My main research interests are technology enhanced learning, web adaptability, and semantic web.

Interest
Topics
Details

Details

  • Name

    José Paulo Leal
  • Cluster

    Computer Science
  • Role

    Senior Researcher
  • Since

    01st January 2009
003
Publications

2020

Visualization of path patterns in semantic graphs

Authors
Leal, JP;

Publication
COMPUTER SCIENCE AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Abstract
Graphs with a large number of nodes and edges are difficult to visualize. Semantic graphs add to the challenge since their nodes and edges have types and this information must be mirrored in the visualization. A common approach to cope with this difficulty is to omit certain nodes and edges, displaying sub-graphs of smaller size. However, other transformations can be used to summarize semantic graphs and this research explores a particular one, both to reduce the graph's size and to focus on its path patterns. A-graphs are a novel kind of graph designed to highlight path patterns using this kind of summarization. They are composed of a-nodes connected by a-edges, and these reflect respectively edges and nodes of the semantic graph. A-graphs trade the visualization of nodes and edges by the visualization of graph path patterns involving typed edges. Thus, they are targeted to users that require a deep understanding of the semantic graph it represents, in particular of its path patterns, rather than to users wanting to browse the semantic graph's content. A-graphs help programmers querying the semantic graph or designers of semantic measures interested in using it as a semantic proxy. Hence, a-graphs are not expected to compete with other forms of semantic graph visualization but rather to be used as a complementary tool. This paper provides a precise definition both of a-graphs and of the mapping of semantic graphs into a-graphs. Their visualization is obtained with a-graphs diagrams. A web application to visualize and interact with these diagrams was implemented to validate the proposed approach. Diagrams of well-known semantic graphs are presented to illustrate the use of agraphs for discovering path patterns in different settings, such as the visualization of massive semantic graphs, the codification of SPARQL or the definition of semantic measures. The validation with large semantic graphs is the basis for a discussion on the insights provided by a-graphs on large semantic graphs: the difference between a-graphs and ontologies, path pattern visualization using a-graphs and the challenges posed by large semantic graphs.

2020

Authoring Game-Based Programming Challenges to Improve Students’ Motivation

Authors
Paiva, JC; Leal, JP; Queirós, R;

Publication
Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing

Abstract
One of the great challenges in programming education is to keep students motivated while working on their programming assignments. Of the techniques proposed in the literature to engage students, gamification is arguably the most widely spread and effective method. Nevertheless, gamification is not a panacea and can be harmful to students. Challenges comprising intrinsic motivators of games, such as graphical feedback and game-thinking, are more prone to have longterm positive effects on students, but those are typically complex to create or adapt to slightly distinct contexts. This paper presents Asura, a game-based programming assessment environment providing means to minimize the hurdle of building game challenges. These challenges invite the student to code a Software Agent to solve a certain problem, in a way that can defeat every opponent. Moreover, the experiment conducted to assess the difficulty of authoring Asura challenges is described. © 2020, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

2020

FGPE AuthorKit A Tool for Authoring Gamified Programming Educational Content

Authors
Paiva, JC; Queirós, R; Leal, JP; Swacha, J;

Publication
Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE

Abstract
We present FGPE AuthorKit, a tool to author programming exercises featuring gamification elements that provide additional motivation for the students to intensify their learning effort. The tool allows the (1) creation of exercises and their associated metadata, (2) selection and parameterization of adequate gamification techniques for a specific exercise or their collection, (3) design of the content structure and sequencing rules, and (4) importing and exporting the content in the formats of choice. © 2020 ACM.

2020

GEdIL—Gamified Education Interoperability Language

Authors
Swacha, J; Paiva, JC; Leal, JP; Queiros, R; Montella, R; Kosta, S;

Publication
Information

Abstract
The paper introduces Gamified Education Interoperability Language (GEdIL), designed as a means to represent the set of gamification concepts and rules applied to courses and exercises separately from their actual educational content. This way, GEdIL allows not only for an easy yet effective specification of gamification schemes for educational purposes, but also sharing them among instructors and reusing in various courses. GEdIL is published as an open format, independent from any commercial vendor, and supported with dedicated open-source software.

2020

Game-Based Coding Challenges to Foster Programming Practice

Authors
Paiva, JC; Leal, JP; Queirós, R;

Publication
OpenAccess Series in Informatics

Abstract
The practice is the crux of learning to program. Automated assessment plays a key role in enabling timely feedback without access to teachers but alone is insufficient to engage students and maximize the outcome of their practice. Graphical feedback and game-thinking promote positive effects on students' motivation as shown by some serious programming games, but those games are complex to create and adapt. This paper presents Asura, an environment for assessment of game-based coding challenges, built on a specialized framework, in which students are invited to develop a software agent (SA) to play it. During the coding phase, students can take advantage of the graphical feedback to complete the proposed task. Some challenges also encourage students to think of a SA that plays in a setting with interaction among SAs. In such a case, the environment supports the creation and visualization of tournaments among submitted agents. Furthermore, the validation of this environment from the learners' perspective is also described. 2012 ACM Subject Classification Applied computing ! Interactive learning environments; Applied computing ! E-learning.

Supervised
thesis

2019

Semantic Measures in Large Semantic Graphs

Author
André Fernandes dos Santos

Institution
UP-FCUP

2018

Assessment of Programming Challenges using Gamification

Author
José Carlos Costa Paiva

Institution
UP-FCUP

2018

Raccode: Um Plugin de Avaliação Automática de Programas para o Eclipse

Author
André Filipe Monteiro da Silva

Institution
UP-FCUP

2018

A long term goal recommender approach for learning environments

Author
AmirHossein Nabizadeh Rafsanjani

Institution
UP-FCUP

2017

EmoSpell, an Emotional Word Analyser

Author
Maria Inês Ferreira da Costa Maia

Institution
UP-FCUP