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Publications

2020

Customized risk assessment in military shipbuilding

Authors
Crispim, J; Fernandes, J; Rego, N;

Publication
Reliability Engineering and System Safety

Abstract
This paper describes a customized risk assessment framework to be applied in military shipbuilding projects. The framework incorporates the Delphi method with visual diagrams, Bayesian Networks (BN) and the expression of expert opinions through linguistic variables. Noisy-OR and Leak Canonical models are used to determine the conditional probabilities of the BN model. The approach can easily be adapted for other shipbuilding construction projects. The visual diagrams that support the Delphi questionnaire favor the comprehensive visualization of the interdependencies between risks, causes, risks and causes, and risks and effects. The applicability of the framework is illustrated through the assessment of risk of two real military shipbuilding projects. This assessment includes a sensitivity analysis that is useful to prioritize mitigation actions. In the two cases studies, the risks with higher probability of occurrence were failures or errors in production, of the contracted, in the requirements, and in planning. The results of the sensitivity analysis showed that a set of mitigation actions directed at relatively easily controllable causes would have achieved important reductions in risk probabilities. © 2020 Elsevier Ltd

2019

Project risk management practices: the organizational maturity influence

Authors
Crispim, J; Silva, LH; Rego, N;

Publication
International Journal of Managing Projects in Business

Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify patterns of project risk management (PRM) practices’ adoption, and provides empirical evidence concerning the importance (and key attributes) of organizational PRM maturity to the use of risk-related practices and project performance. Design/methodology/approach: The research involved two phases: interviews with five project managers, and a worldwide survey of project managers that resulted in the analysis of 865 valid questionnaire responses. Cluster analysis was used to classify PRM practices’ use, factor analysis to detect the structure of the relationship between the variables measuring PRM practices’ use and a multiple regression analysis (with canonical correlation) to further reveal the different degrees to which PRM practices and organizational maturity are associated. Findings: The identified patterns of risk practices’ adoption indicate that different contexts of organization PRM maturity and project complexity influence practices selection. The PRM practices related with targets (e.g. time-phased budget plan) are the most used, and those related to tools and techniques (e.g. S-curve) are the least used. Additionally, the obtained results confirm that organizational PRM maturity influences risk practices’ usage, moderated by project complexity, and organizational PRM maturity influences project performance. Originality/value: Empirical methods were used to investigate the relationship between organizational PRM maturity and a large set of PRM practices with project complexity as a moderator. Gaps in the use of PRM practices (i.e. areas where more PRM knowledge and training are needed) were identified. Finally, this work identifies the attributes of organizational maturity with implications in practices’ usage and project performance. © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited.

2018

A two-phase MILP approach to integrate order, customer and manufacturer characteristics into Dynamic Manufacturing Network formation and operational planning

Authors
Sadic, S; de Sousa, JP; Crispim, JA;

Publication
EXPERT SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS

Abstract
A Dynamic Manufacturing Network (DMN) is the manufacturing industry application of the Virtual Enterprise (VE) business model based on real time information sharing and process integration. DMNs are normally formed and supported by a collaborative platform previously designed and built by a preexisting strategic partnership. The collaborative platform forms and tracks each DMN through all phases of its life cycle which leads to the accumulation and storage of large historical datasets on partner and customer characteristics and actions. This data holds the key to customer and manufacturer behavioral patterns and performances that can further be used in the decision making processes. In this study, we have focused on tackling this widely neglected research opportunity, by integrating manufacturer, order and customer data and characteristics into DMN formation and planning. The developed big data analytics approach consists of TOPSIS, fuzzy inference system and multi objective optimization techniques. Initially, by integrating the TOPSIS multi criteria decision making technique with a fuzzy inference system (FIS) we have computed indices for Manufacturer reliability and Order priority. Then we developed a multi-objective mixed integer linear programming (MILP) model to generate efficient solutions minimizing cost and assigning more reliable manufacturers to orders with higher priority.

2018

Palestinian doctors' views on patient-centered care in hospitals

Authors
Sultan, WIM; Sultan, MIM; Crispim, J;

Publication
BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH

Abstract
BackgroundUnderstanding the perceived importance of Patient-Centered Care (PCC) among Palestinian doctors and how the provider and other clinical characteristics may impact their views on PCC is essential to determine the extent to which PCC can be implemented. This study investigates the provision of PCC among hospital doctors in a developing and unstable country, namely, Palestine.MethodsThis descriptive, cross-sectional research employed self-report survey among 369 Palestinian doctors working in hospitals in 2016. Respondents completed the Provider-Patient Relationship Questionnaire (PPRQ) and were asked to rate the importance of 16 PCC subjects in a context-free manner. Then they scored the existence of eight contextual attributes in their workplace.ResultsAlthough 71.4% of the participants got training in communication, only 45% of the participants knew about PCC. 48.8% of doctors considered the exchange of information with patients most important PCC component. Clustering identified three groups of doctors: 32.4% of doctors reported good perceptions of PCC, 47.5% moderate; and 20.1% poor. Older, married, and specialist doctors and those familiar with PCC are more likely classified in the good cluster. Results revealed a significant difference between doctors' views based on their gender, experience, marital status, previous knowledge about PCC, and type of hospital in favor of males, experienced, married, familiar with PCC, and doctors in private hospital respectively. The level of job interest, nurses' cooperation, the tendency of patients to hide information, and doctor's friendly style were positively related with more perceived importance of PCC.ConclusionWe identified benchmark doctors who perceive the high relative importance of PCC. Our results highlighted knowledge gaps and training weaknesses among doctors in public and private hospitals in respect to their views on PCC. Decision makers may invest in the determined contextual predictors to enhance attitudes towards PCC. This work doesn't address patients' views on PCC.

2018

Are public hospitals reforming efficiently in West Bank?

Authors
Sultan, WIM; Crispim, J;

Publication
CONFLICT AND HEALTH

Abstract
BackgroundThe structure, function, and capacity of the health care system in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPT) had been largely shaped by the complex political history of the country. Since the establishment of the Palestinian Authority in 1994, the reform efforts were subsidized much by the international aids to rebuild the country's institutional capacity. No previous studies have provided a realistic evaluation of Palestinian achievements in the conduct of public healthcare, we examine the relative productive efficiency of public hospitals (their managers' success in the usage of resources) during 2010-2015 within West Bank and Jordan. Then, we estimate the efficiency of policies within which managers operate (the program efficiency) across the two countries.MethodsWe employ the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) models to distinguish between within-country managerial efficiencies and public policy program efficiencies across the two countries. The study follows two key steps, the first step evaluates managerial efficiencies and explores trends in performance within each country. Then, we examine the program efficiencies across the two countries.ResultsPublic hospitals improved their year-specific overall efficiency from 75 to 80% in the West Bank and from 78 to 86% in Jordan in 2010 and 2015 respectively. Changes in efficiency are driven by scale effects in West Bank and by managerial enhancements in Jordan. Program efficiency in West Bank outperformed Jordan during 2010-2012, there was no significant difference in mean program efficiencies between the two countries during 2013-2015.ConclusionsThis work addresses a gap in the DEA literature by empirically investigating the efficiency of public hospitals as distinct from program efficiency in a developing country, namely, Palestine. Findings stimulate hospital managers to enhance potential improvements, policymakers to allocate resources, and international donors to focus on the right adoption of new technology to get better benefits from their considerable investments in public hospitals.