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About

About

Diogo Cocharro has a multifaceted activity and interests related to sound and music. He nurtures a passion for music performance and all technological-­based forms of creating music, in particular music production and music interactivity. These interests lead him to graduate in Electronic Music and Musical Production from School of Applied Arts (ESART) in Castelo Branco and pursuing a Master in Multimedia with specialization in Sound Design and Interactive Music from the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto.  Since then, he has worked as a research assistant at the Sound and Music Computing Group from INESC TEC and as an Invited Assistant Professor at ESART. He counts with several publications in internationals conference and renown journals. As a media artist, Cocharro has co-­developed a few interactive music installations, including Tweetering Sounds (2010), Sound Potter (2010), Human Pong (2011), PerturbArte (2011) with presentations at the Future Places Festival and at Casa da Musica. As a musician he worked with different projects covering many different musical genres, with whom he performed in various venues across Portugal. The album "Colouring Book" with the awarded revelation band Lokomotive Station and the collaboration with Xicara stand out in his activities as a musician. As a sound technician he has been working as a freelancer for a few years now in various renown festival in Portugal. All these complementary skills and aptitudes promote above all an active listener who strives to understand artistic needs in order to provide exceptional and creative solutions.

diogococharro.info

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Details

Details

  • Name

    Diogo Miguel Cocharro
  • Role

    External Student
  • Since

    15th November 2010
  • Nationality

    Portugal
  • Contacts

    +351222094299
    diogo.m.cocharro@inesctec.pt
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Publications

2022

SYNCOPATION AND GROOVE IN POLYPHONIC MUSIC: PATTERNS MATTER

Authors
Sioros, G; Madison, G; Cocharro, D; Danielsen, A; Gouyon, F;

Publication
MUSIC PERCEPTION

Abstract
MUSIC OFTEN EVOKES A REGULAR BEAT AND A pleasurable sensation of wanting to move to that beat called groove. Recent studies show that a rhythmic pattern's ability to evoke groove increases at moderate levels of syncopation, essentially, when some notes occur earlier than expected. We present two studies that investigate that effect of syncopation in more realistic polyphonic music examples. First, listeners rated their urge to move to music excerpts transcribed from funk and rock songs, and to algorithmically transformed versions of these excerpts: 1) with the original syncopation removed, and 2) with various levels of pseudorandom syncopation introduced. While the original excerpts were rated higher than the de-syncopated, the algorithmic syncopation was not as successful in evoking groove. Consequently, a moderate level of syncopation increases groove, but only for certain syncopation patterns. The second study provides detailed comparisons of the original and transformed rhythmic structures that revealed key differences between them in: 1) the distribution of syncopation across instruments and metrical positions, 2) the counter-meter figures formed by the syncopating notes, and 3) the number of pickup notes. On this basis, we form four concrete hypotheses about the function of syncopation in groove, to be tested in future experiments.

2021

A Review of Musical Rhythm Representation and (Dis)similarity in Symbolic and Audio Domains

Authors
Cocharro, D; Bernardes, G; Bernardo, G; Lemos, C;

Publication
Perspectives on Music, Sound and Musicology

Abstract

2021

Understanding cross-genre rhythmic audio compatibility: A computational approach

Authors
Lemos, C; Cocharro, D; Bernardes, G;

Publication
ACM International Conference Proceeding Series

Abstract
Rhythmic similarity, a fundamental task within Music Information Retrieval, has recently been applied in creative music contexts to retrieve musical audio or guide audio-content transformations. However, there is still very little knowledge of the typical rhythmic similarity values between overlapping musical structures per instrument, genre, and time scales, which we denote as rhythmic compatibility. This research provides the first steps towards the understanding of rhythmic compatibility from the systematic analysis of MedleyDB, a large multi-track musical database composed and performed by artists. We apply computational methods to compare database stems using representative rhythmic similarity metrics - Rhythmic Histogram (RH) and Beat Spectrum (BS) - per genre and instrumental families and to understand whether RH and BS are prone to discriminate genres at different time scales. Our results suggest that 1) rhythmic compatibility values lie between [.002,.354] (RH) and [.1,.881] (BS), 2) RH outperforms BS in discriminating genres, and 3) different time scale in RH and BS impose significant differences in rhythmic compatibility. © 2021 ACM.

2019

Dynamic Music Generation, Audio Analysis-Synthesis Methods

Authors
Bernardes, G; Cocharro, D;

Publication
Encyclopedia of Computer Graphics and Games

Abstract

2016

A multi-level tonal interval space for modelling pitch relatedness and musical consonance

Authors
Bernardes, G; Cocharro, D; Caetano, M; Guedes, C; Davies, MEP;

Publication
JOURNAL OF NEW MUSIC RESEARCH

Abstract
In this paper we present a 12-dimensional tonal space in the context of the Tonnetz, Chew's Spiral Array, and Harte's 6-dimensional Tonal Centroid Space. The proposed Tonal Interval Space is calculated as the weighted Discrete Fourier Transform of normalized 12-element chroma vectors, which we represent as six circles covering the set of all possible pitch intervals in the chroma space. By weighting the contribution of each circle (and hence pitch interval) independently, we can create a space in which angular and Euclidean distances among pitches, chords, and regions concur with music theory principles. Furthermore, the Euclidean distance of pitch configurations from the centre of the space acts as an indicator of consonance.