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About

About

PhD (2002) in Science and Technology Policy at Science and Technology Policy Research (SPRU), University of Sussex, UK. MPhil (1997) in Economics at Faculdade de Economia da Universidade do Porto, and undergraduate course (1992) in Economics at Faculdade de Economia da Universidade do Porto. Aggregation in Economics in 2008 at Faculdade de Economia da Universidade do Porto. Assistant Professor at Faculdade Economia (Universidade do Porto), lecturing and researching in Innovation Management, Structural Change, and Innovation and Macroeconomics MPhil and PhD Courses. Scientific Coordinator of UITT (Unity of Innovation and Technology Transfer), INESC-Porto.

Interest
Topics
Details

Details

Publications

2020

Merging social computing with content: a proposal of a new film platform, Avids

Authors
Governo, F; Teixeira, AAC; Brochado, AM;

Publication
Behaviour & Information Technology

Abstract

2020

The Focus on Poverty in the Most Influential Journals in Economics: A Bibliometric Analysis of the “Blue Ribbon” Journals

Authors
Cardoso, SM; Teixeira, AAC;

Publication
Poverty and Public Policy

Abstract
Scientific publications tend to influence policymakers significantly. Despite the scientific and social importance of poverty today, the attention the top economic journals (American Economic Review; Econometrica; International Economic Review; Journal of Economic Theory; Journal of Political Economy; Quarterly Journal of Economics; Review of Economic Studies) pay to the matter is not clear, particularly in the so-called “Blue Ribbon” journals (and Review of Economics and Statistics). On the basis of bibliometric techniques, we analyzed all 27,322 articles published in the “Blue Ribbon” journals from 1970 to 2018. This is the first study on the scientific attention paid to poverty by the most influential journals in the field of economics. Two main findings can be highlighted: (i) the scientific attention paid to poverty in the Blue Ribbon journals is relatively meager, but it has observed a positive trend, increasing from a modest 0.36 percent of the total articles published in the 1970s to 1.92 percent of total publications in the 2010s; and (ii) the relative weight of specific poverty subtopics has significantly changed over the last 50 years, shifting from a focus on defining and measuring poverty in the earlier decades to policy-related issues in the most recent period (2000 onward). © 2020 Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148, USA, and 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford, OX4 2DQ.

2020

The impact of research output on economic growth by fields of science: a dynamic panel data analysis, 1980–2016

Authors
Pinto, T; Teixeira, AAC;

Publication
Scientometrics

Abstract
Whether research output significantly impacts on economic growth, and which research areas/fields of science matter the most to improve the economic performance of countries, stand as fundamental endeavors of scientific inquiry. Although the extant literature has analyzed the impact of research output on economic growth both holistically and by field, the impact of academic knowledge as a capital good (hard and social sciences) versus a final good (medical and humanities) has been largely neglected in analyses involving large sets of countries over a broad period of time. Based on a sample of 65 countries over 36 years (1980 to 2016), and employing system GMM dynamic panel data estimations, four main results are worth highlighting: (1) holistic research output positively and significantly impacts on economic growth; (2) both the academic knowledge of scientific areas that most resemble capital goods (physical sciences, engineering and technology, life sciences or social sciences) or final goods (base clinical, pre-clinical and health or arts and humanities) foster economic performance; (3) the global impact of research output is particularly high in the fields of engineering and technology, social sciences, and physics; and (4) the impact of research output on economic growth occurs mainly through structural change processes involving the reallocation of resources towards the industrial sector. © 2020, Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary.

2020

Ageing Population: Identifying the Determinants of Ageing in the Least Developed Countries

Authors
Nagarajan, NR; Teixeira, AAC; Silva, ST;

Publication
Population Research and Policy Review

Abstract
The issue of population ageing is no longer exclusively centred on developed countries. Empirical studies have proven that the rise in the proportion of the older age group has been already visible in the least developed countries (LDCs). The primary concern of population ageing in LDCs is that ageing is approaching LDCs even faster than approaching developing and developed countries. We found that despite the common factors such as human capital development, female participation in the labour market and economic growth, the annual growth rate of the ageing of LDCs highly depends on international aids (health care and development) and the rising number of emigrations over the working-age population. Our empirical results suggest that the existence of the ageing population in LDCs determine by the involvement of international bodies in supporting the welfare system of the country and the policy initiatives of developed countries in attracting migrant workers of LDCs to overcome the ageing problem in their countries. © 2020, Springer Nature B.V.

2020

Does corruption boost or harm firms’ performance in developing and emerging economies? A firm-level study

Authors
Martins, L; Cerdeira, J; A.C. Teixeira, A;

Publication
World Economy

Abstract
In the last decade, a growing number of studies have addressed the ongoing debate about whether corruption “sands” or “greases” the wheels of business at the firm level. This study revisits this debate and proposes a comprehensive theoretical framework to test whether corruption harms or boosts firm performance, as well as the extent to which this relationship is mediated by the countries’ institutional settings, the size and strategic behaviour of the firms, and market competition. Based on a sample of 21,250 firms located in 117 emerging and developing countries, and resorting to instrumental variable (IV) estimations, three main results were found: (a) regardless of the proxy used for corruption and firm performance, the former clearly harms the latter; (b) corruption “greases the wheels” of business for African firms but it “sands the wheels” for firms in Latin America, the Caribbean, Eastern Europe, Central Asia, and Southern Asia; and (c) the negative impact of corruption on performance is mitigated for larger and exporting firms. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Supervised
thesis

2019

The impact of the Global Financial Crisis on open innovation Strate-gies and innovation performance of portuguese companies

Author
Luís Carlos Couto Moreira

Institution
UP-FEP

2019

Essays on Research Output, Human Capital, Structural Change and Economic Growth.

Author
Tânia Filipa Ferreira Pinto

Institution
UP-FEP

2019

Open Innovation Strategies in SMEs Located in Portugal

Author
Vítor Manuel Pereira Pinto Freitas

Institution
UP-FEUP

2019

Where are the Poor in Mainstream Economics? An Exploratory Bibliometric analysis at the Blue Ribbon

Author
Sara Mota Cardoso

Institution
UP-FEP

2019

Trends of Rural Entrepreneurship - Essays Concerning the Theme.

Author
Maria Lúcia de Jesus Pato

Institution
UP-FEP