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About

Research interests:

Optimization, heuristics and meta-heuristics, dynamic programming, operations research, simulation-optimization, machine learning, artificial intelligence, decision support systems, distributed ledger technologies, engineering applications of the above

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Details

Details

001
Publications

2018

Coupled ICT and Dynamic Optimization Tools Toward an Integrated Earthwork Management System

Authors
Correia, AG; Parente, M;

Publication
Proceedings of GeoShanghai 2018 International Conference: Transportation Geotechnics and Pavement Engineering

Abstract

2018

An integrated framework for multi-criteria optimization of thin concrete shells at early design stages

Authors
Gomes, C; Parente, M; Azenha, M; Lino, JC;

Publication
Advanced Engineering Informatics

Abstract
Thin shells are crucially dependent on their shape in order to obtain proper structural performance. In this context, the optimal shape will guarantee performance and safety requirements, while minimizing the use of materials, as well as construction/maintenance costs. Thin shell design is a team-based, multidisciplinary, and iterative process, which requires a high level of interaction between the various parties involved, especially between the Architecture and Engineering teams. As a result of technological development, novel concepts and tools become available to support this process. On the one hand, concepts like Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) show the potential to have a high impact on multidisciplinary environments such as the one in question, supporting the early decision-making process with the availability of as much information as possible. On the other hand, optimization techniques and tools should be highlighted, as they fit the needs and requirements of both the shell shape definition process and the IPD concept. These can be used not only to support advanced design stages, but also to facilitate the initial formulation of shape during the early interactions between architect and structural engineer from an IPD point of view. This paper proposes a methodology aimed at enhancing the interactive and iterative process associated with the early stages of thin shell design, supported by an integrated framework. The latter is based on several tools, namely Rhinoceros 3D, Grasshopper, and Robot Structural Analysis. In order to achieve full integration of the support tools, a custom devised module was developed, so as to allow interoperability between Grasshopper and Robot Structural Analysis. The system resorts to various technologies targeted at improving the shell shape definition process, such as formfinding techniques, parametric and generative models, as well as shape optimization techniques that leverage on multi criteria evolutionary algorithms. The proposed framework is implemented in a set of fictitious scenarios, in which the best thin reinforced concrete shell structures are sought according to given design requirements. Results stemming from this implementation emphasize its interoperability, flexibility, and capability to promote interaction between the elements of the design team, ultimately outputting a set of diverse and creative shell shapes, and thus supporting the pre-design process. © 2018

2017

1st Seminar on Transportation Geotechnics, Improvement, Reinforcement and Rehabilitation of Transportation Infrastructures

Authors
Pinto, A; JETSJ, Universidade de Lisboa,; Freire, AC; Cristóvão, A; Correia, AA; Gomes Correia, A; Fortunato, E; Machado do Vale, JL; Neves, J; Barroso, M; Parente, M; Laboratório Nacional de Engenharia Civil,; JETSJ,; Universidade de Coimbra,; Universidade do Minho,; Laboratório Nacional de Engenharia Civil,; Carpitech,; Universidade de Lisboa,; Laboratório Nacional de Engenharia Civil,; INESC TEC,;

Publication

Abstract

2016

Intelligent Compaction Technology for Geomaterials: A Demonstration Project

Authors
Gomes Correia, A; Parente, M;

Publication
Materials and Infrastructures 1

Abstract
Intelligent Compaction (IC), which is a part of compaction management, is a real-time automatic adjustment and continuous compaction control technology of geomaterials and asphalt layers. Adjustment of the compaction parameters by the equipment is conducted simultaneously to the compaction process, as well as the continuous measurement of a dynamic compaction value, which is an indicator of the material's degree of compaction. This chapter seeks to assess the advantages and disadvantages of IC, as well as formulating a comparison with conventional compaction methods in terms of efficiency. This goal was achieved through in situ application of various technologies to two distinct types of material: a soil-rockfill mixture and a sandy soil. Data was obtained and analysed by the IC continuous information, as well as by the application of several different conventional compaction control tests and methods. Results show that the IC technology presents a superior performance, as well as various advantages when compared to conventional compactors.

2016

Metaheuristics, Data Mining and Geographic Information Systems for Earthworks Equipment Allocation

Authors
Parente, M; Correia, AG; Cortez, P;

Publication
ADVANCES IN TRANSPORTATION GEOTECHNICS III

Abstract
Optimal and sustainable allocation of equipment in earthwork tasks is a complex problem that requires the study of several different aspects, as well as the knowledge of a large number of factors. In truth, earthworks are comprised by a combination of repetitive, sequential, and interdependent activities based on heavy mechanical equipment (i.e., resources), such as excavators, dumper trucks, bulldozers and compactors. In order to optimally allocate the available resources, knowledge regarding their specifications (e.g., capacity, weight, horsepower) and the work conditions to which they will be subjected (e.g., material types, required and available volumes in embankment and excavation fronts, respectively) is essential. This knowledge can be translated into the productivity (i.e., work rate) of each piece of equipment when working under a specific set of conditions. Moreover, since earthwork tasks are inherently sequential and interdependent, the interaction between the allocated equipment must be taken into account. A typical example of this is the need for matching the work rate of an excavator team with the capacity of a truck team to haul the excavated material to the embankment fronts. Given the non-trivial characteristics of the earthwork allocation problem, conventional Operation Research (e.g., linear programming) and blind search methods are infeasible. As such, a potential solution is to adopt metaheuristics - modern optimization methods capable of searching large search space regions under a reasonable use of computational resources. While this may address the issue of optimizing such a complex problem, the lack of knowledge regarding optimization parameters under different work conditions, such as equipment productivity, calls for a different approach. Bearing in mind the availability of large databases, including in the earthworks area, that have been gathered in recent years by construction companies, technologies like data mining (DM) come forward as ideal tools for solving this problem. Indeed, the learning capabilities of DM algorithms can be applied to databases embodying the productivity of several equipment types when subjected to different work conditions. The extracted knowledge can then be used to estimate the productivity of the available equipment under similar work conditions. Furthermore, as previously referred, since earthwork tasks include the material hauling from excavation to embankment fronts, it also becomes imperative to analyze and optimize the possible transportation networks. In this context, the use of geographic information systems (GIS) provides an easy method to study the possible trajectories for transportation equipment in a construction site, ultimately allowing for a choice of the best paths to improve the workflow. This paper explores the advantages of integrating the referred technologies, among others, in order to allow for a sustainable management of earthworks. This is translated in the form of an evolutionary multi-criteria optimization system, capable of searching for the best allocation of the available equipment that minimizes a set of goals (e.g., cost, duration, environmental impact). Results stemming from the validation of the resulting system using real-world data from a Portuguese construction site demonstrate the potential and importance of using this kind of technologies for a sustainable management and optimization of earthworks.