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About

About

Luís Paulo Santos is and Assistant Professor of the Department of Informatics, Universidade do Minho and researcher of CSIG, INESC-TEC. His research area is rendering and global illumination, focusing on algorithms' performance and heterogeneous parallel computing (CPU + GPU + Knights Landing) to reduce convergence tiome towards perceptually correct solutions. He published several papers in the most relevant international fora of Computer Graphics (conferences and journals), and authored a book on Bayesian Monte Carlo Rendering. He nelongs to the Program Committee of several international conferences, having chaired a few of these and organized 6 such events in Portugal.

He has been Vicer Director of the Department, and the Informatics Engineering degree. He was the Director of the Doctoral Programme on Informatics. He integrated the Committe designted by the Rector to install an United Nations University Operational Unit on Electronic Governance in Guimarães, Portugal, and is currently a member of the direction of the unit responsible for the interface between the 2 institutions.

He is Associate Editor of the Computers & Graphics Elsevier journal and President of the Portuguese Group of Computer Graphics, formally the portuguese chapter of Eurographics, for the period of 2017-2018.

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Details

Details

  • Name

    Luís Paulo Santos
  • Cluster

    Computer Science
  • Role

    Senior Researcher
  • Since

    01st January 2017
Publications

2013

Interactive high fidelity visualization of complex materials on the GPU

Authors
Silva, N; Santos, LP;

Publication
COMPUTERS & GRAPHICS-UK

Abstract
High fidelity interactive rendering is of major importance for footwear designers, since it allows experimenting with virtual prototypes of new products, rather than producing expensive physical mock-ups. This requires capturing the appearance of complex materials using image based approaches, such as the Bidirectional Texture Function (BTF), to allow subsequent interactive visualization, while still maintaining the capability to edit the materials' appearance. However, interactive global illumination rendering of compressed editable BTFs with ordinary computing resources remains to be demonstrated. In this paper we demonstrate interactive global illumination by using a GPU ray tracing engine and the Sparse Parametric Mixture Model representation of BTFs, which is particularly well suited for BTF editing. We propose a rendering pipeline and data layout which allow for interactive frame rates and provide a scalability analysis with respect to the scene's complexity. We also include soft shadows from area light sources and approximate global illumination with ambient occlusion by resorting to progressive refinement, which quickly converges to a high quality image while maintaining interactive frame rates by limiting the number of rays shot per frame. Acceptable performance is also demonstrated under dynamic settings, including camera movements, changing lighting conditions and dynamic geometry.

2013

A Spherical Gaussian Framework for Bayesian Monte Carlo Rendering of Glossy Surfaces

Authors
Marques, R; Bouville, C; Ribardiere, M; Santos, LP; Bouatouch, K;

Publication
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VISUALIZATION AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS

Abstract
The Monte Carlo method has proved to be very powerful to cope with global illumination problems but it remains costly in terms of sampling operations. In various applications, previous work has shown that Bayesian Monte Carlo can significantly outperform importance sampling Monte Carlo thanks to a more effective use of the prior knowledge and of the information brought by the samples set. These good results have been confirmed in the context of global illumination but strictly limited to the perfect diffuse case. Our main goal in this paper is to propose a more general Bayesian Monte Carlo solution that allows dealing with nondiffuse BRDFs thanks to a spherical Gaussian-based framework. We also propose a fast hyperparameters determination method that avoids learning the hyperparameters for each BRDF. These contributions represent two major steps toward generalizing Bayesian Monte Carlo for global illumination rendering. We show that we achieve substantial quality improvements over importance sampling at comparable computational cost.

2013

clOpenCL - Supporting Distributed Heterogeneous Computing in HPC Clusters

Authors
Alves, A; Rufino, J; Pina, A; Santos, LP;

Publication
EURO-PAR 2012: PARALLEL PROCESSING WORKSHOPS

Abstract
Clusters that combine heterogeneous compute device architectures, coupled with novel programming models, have created a true alternative to traditional (homogeneous) cluster computing, allowing to leverage the performance of parallel applications. In this paper we introduce clOpenCL, a platform that supports the simple deployment and efficient running of OpenCL-based parallel applications that may span several cluster nodes, expanding the original single-node OpenCL model. clOpenCL is deployed through user level services, thus allowing OpenCL applications from different users to share the same cluster nodes and their compute devices. Data exchanges between distributed clOpenCL components rely on Open-MX, a high-performance communication library. We also present extensive experimental data and key conditions that must be addressed when exploiting clOpenCL with real applications.

2013

Spherical fibonacci point sets for illumination integrals

Authors
Marques, R; Bouville, C; Ribardiere, M; Santos, LP; Bouatouch, K;

Publication
Computer Graphics Forum

Abstract
Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) methods exhibit a faster convergence rate than that of classic Monte Carlo methods. This feature has made QMC prevalent in image synthesis, where it is frequently used for approximating the value of spherical integrals (e.g. illumination integral). The common approach for generating QMC sampling patterns for spherical integration is to resort to unit square low-discrepancy sequences and map them to the hemisphere. However such an approach is suboptimal as these sequences do not account for the spherical topology and their discrepancy properties on the unit square are impaired by the spherical projection. In this paper we present a strategy for producing high-quality QMC sampling patterns for spherical integration by resorting to spherical Fibonacci point sets. We show that these patterns, when applied to illumination integrals, are very simple to generate and consistently outperform existing approaches, both in terms of root mean square error (RMSE) and image quality. Furthermore, only a single pattern is required to produce an image, thanks to a scrambling scheme performed directly in the spherical domain. Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) methods exhibit a faster convergence rate than that of classic Monte Carlo methods. This feature has made QMC prevalent in image synthesis, where it is frequently used for approximating the value of spherical integrals (e.g. illumination integral). The common approach for generating QMC sampling patterns for spherical integration is to resort to unit square low-discrepancy sequences and map them to the hemisphere. However such an approach is suboptimal as these sequences do not account for the spherical topology and their discrepancy properties on the unit square are impaired by the spherical projection. © 2013 The Authors Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.