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About

Hadi Fanaee-T received his PhD degree (with distinction) in Computer Science from Faculty of Science of University of Porto, Portugal in November 2015. Since then he is a Postdoctoral researcher in European FP7 Project ?MAESTRA? at INESC TEC research institute. His main research interests are interdisciplinary applications of tensor decompositions, anomaly/event detection and spatiotemporal data mining. He is the first-author of 7 journal articles and 7 conference papers. He has served as a Senior PC member for IJCAI2015, PC Member for ECML-PKDD 2013-15 and also reviewer for TDKE, DMKD, ML, KAIS, KBS, CSUR and many more scientific venues. He was invited talk at the summer school on "mining big and complex data" held in Ohrid, Macedonia, September 2016. He is co-advisor of one PhD student, one visiting PhD student, and two research fellows. He is also the leader and main developer in SimTensor software project (www.simtensor.org).

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Details

Details

  • Name

    Hadi Fanaee Tork
  • Cluster

    Computer Science
  • Role

    External Research Collaborator
  • Since

    16th April 2012
001
Publications

2017

Mobility Mining Using Nonnegative Tensor Factorization

Authors
Nosratabadi, HE; T, HF; Gama, J;

Publication
Progress in Artificial Intelligence - 18th EPIA Conference on Artificial Intelligence, EPIA 2017, Porto, Portugal, September 5-8, 2017, Proceedings

Abstract
Mobility mining has lots of applications in urban planning and transportation systems. In particular, extracting mobility patterns enables service providers to have a global insight about the mobility behaviors which consequently leads to providing better services to the citizens. In the recent years several data mining techniques have been presented to tackle this problem. These methods usually are either spatial extension of temporal methods or temporal extension of spatial methods. However, still a framework that can keep the natural structure of mobility data has not been considered. Non-negative tensor factorizations (NNTF) have shown great applications in topic modelling and pattern recognition. However, unfortunately their usefulness in mobility mining is less explored. In this paper we propose a new mobility pattern mining framework based on a recent non-negative tensor model called BetaNTF. We also present a new approach based on interpretability concept for determination of number of components in the tensor rank selection process. We later demonstrate some meaningful mobility patterns extracted with the proposed method from bike sharing network mobility data in Boston, USA. © Springer International Publishing AG 2017.

2016

Event detection from traffic tensors: A hybrid model

Authors
Fanaee T, H; Gama, J;

Publication
NEUROCOMPUTING

Abstract
A traffic tensor or simply origin x destination x time is a new data model for conventional origin/destination (O/D) matrices. Tensor models are traffic data analysis techniques which use this new data model to improve performance. Tensors outperform other models because both temporal and spatial fluctuations of traffic patterns are simultaneously taken into account, obtaining results that follow a more natural pattern. Three major types of fluctuations can occur in traffic tensors: mutations to the overall traffic flows, alterations to the network topology and chaotic behaviors. How can we detect events in a system that is faced with all types of fluctuations during its life cycle? Our initial studies reveal that the current design of tensor models face some difficulties in dealing with such a realistic scenario. We propose a new hybrid tensor model called HTM that enhances the detection ability of tensor models by using a parallel tracking technique on the traffic's topology. However, tensor decomposition techniques such as Tucker, a key step for tensor models, require a complicated parameter that not only is difficult to choose but also affects the model's quality. We address this problem examining a recent technique called adjustable core size Tucker decomposition (ACS-Tucker). Experiments on simulated and real-world data sets from different domains versus several techniques indicate that the proposed model is effective and robust, therefore it constitutes a viable alternative for analysis of the traffic tensors.

2016

Tensor-based anomaly detection: An interdisciplinary survey

Authors
Fanaee T, H; Gama, J;

Publication
KNOWLEDGE-BASED SYSTEMS

Abstract
Traditional spectral-based methods such as PCA are popular for anomaly detection in a variety of problems and domains. However, if data includes tensor (multiway) structure (e.g. space-time-measurements), some meaningful anomalies may remain invisible with these methods. Although tensor-based anomaly detection (TAD) has been applied within a variety of disciplines over the last twenty years, it is not yet recognized as a formal category in anomaly detection. This survey aims to highlight the potential of tensor-based techniques as a novel approach for detection and identification of abnormalities and failures. We survey the interdisciplinary works in which TAD is reported and characterize the learning strategies, methods and applications; extract the important open issues in TAD and provide the corresponding existing solutions according to the state-of-the-art.

2015

EigenEvent: An algorithm for event detection from complex data streams in syndromic surveillance

Authors
Fanaee T, H; Gama, J;

Publication
INTELLIGENT DATA ANALYSIS

Abstract
Syndromic surveillance systems continuously monitor multiple pre-diagnostic daily streams of indicators from different regions with the aim of early detection of disease outbreaks. The main objective of these systems is to detect outbreaks hours or days before the clinical and laboratory confirmation. The type of data that is being generated via these systems is usually multivariate and seasonal with spatial and temporal dimensions. The algorithm What's Strange About Recent Events (WSARE) is the state-of-the-art method for such problems. It exhaustively searches for contrast sets in the multivariate data and signals an alarm when find statistically significant rules. This bottom-up approach presents a much lower detection delay comparing the existing top-down approaches. However, WSARE is very sensitive to the small-scale changes and subsequently comes with a relatively high rate of false alarms. We propose a new approach called EigenEvent that is neither fully top-down nor bottom-up. In this method, we instead of top-down or bottom-up search, track changes in data correlation structure via eigenspace techniques. This new methodology enables us to detect both overall changes (via eigenvalue) and dimension-level changes (via eigenvectors). Experimental results on hundred sets of benchmark data reveals that EigenEvent presents a better overall performance comparing state-of-the-art, in particular in terms of the false alarm rate.

2015

Eigenspace method for spatiotemporal hotspot detection

Authors
Fanaee T, H; Gama, J;

Publication
EXPERT SYSTEMS

Abstract
Hotspot detection aims at identifying sub-groups in the observations that are unexpected, with respect to some baseline information. For instance, in disease surveillance, the purpose is to detect sub-regions in spatiotemporal space, where the count of reported diseases (e.g. cancer) is higher than expected, with respect to the population. The state-of-the-art method for this kind of problem is the space-time scan statistics, which exhaustively search the whole space through a sliding window looking for significant spatiotemporal clusters. Space-time scan statistics makes some restrictive assumptions about the distribution of data, the shape of the hotspots and the quality of data, which can be unrealistic for some non-traditional data sources. A novel methodology called EigenSpot is proposed where instead of an exhaustive search over the space, it tracks the changes in a space-time occurrences structure. The new approach does not only present much more computational efficiency but also makes no assumption about the data distribution, hotspot shape or the data quality. The principal idea is that with the joint combination of abnormal elements in the principal spatial and the temporal singular vectors, the location of hotspots in the spatiotemporal space can be approximated. The experimental evaluation, both on simulated and real data sets, reveals the effectiveness of the proposed method.