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Details

  • Name

    David Gonçalves Narciso
  • Cluster

    Computer Science
  • Role

    Research Assistant
  • Since

    12th January 2016
002
Publications

2021

A systematic review on the use of immersive virtual reality to train professionals

Authors
Narciso, D; Melo, M; Rodrigues, S; Cunha, JP; Vasconcelos Raposo, J; Bessa, M;

Publication
MULTIMEDIA TOOLS AND APPLICATIONS

Abstract
The main goal of this systematic review is to synthesize existing evidence on the use of immersive virtual reality (IVR) to train professionals as well as to identify the main gaps and challenges that still remain and need to be addressed by future research. Following a comprehensive search, 66 documents were identified, assessed for relevance, and analysed. The main areas of application of IVR-based training were identified. Moreover, we identified the stimuli provided, the hardware used and information regarding training evaluation. The results showed that the areas in which a greater number of works were published were those related to healthcare and elementary occupations. In hardware, the most commonly used equipment was head mounted displays (HMDs), headphones included in the HMDs and handheld controllers. Moreover, the results indicated that IVR training systems are often evaluated manually, the most common metric being questionnaires applied before and after the experiment, and that IVR training systems have a positive effect in training professionals. We conclude that the literature is insufficient for determining the effect of IVR in the training of professionals. Although some works indicated promising results, there are still relevant themes that must be explored and limitations to overcome before virtual training replaces real-world training.

2020

Virtual reality in training: an experimental study with firefighters

Authors
Narciso, D; Melo, M; Raposo, JV; Cunha, J; Bessa, M;

Publication
Multimedia Tools and Applications

Abstract
Training with Virtual Reality (VR) can bring several benefits, such as the reduction of costs and risks. We present an experimental study that aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a Virtual Environment (VE) to train firefighters using an innovative approach based on a Real Environment (RE) exercise. To measure the VE’s effectiveness we used a Presence Questionnaire (PQ) and participant’s cybersickness, stress and fatigue. Results from the PQ showed that participants rated the VE with high spatial presence and moderate realness and immersion. Signs of stress, analyzed from participant’s Heart-Rate Variability, were shown in the RE but not in the VE. In the remaining variables, there was only an indicative difference for fatigue in the RE. Therefore, the results suggest that although our training VE was successful in giving participants spatial presence and in not causing cybersickness, its realness and immersion provided were not enough to provoke a similar RE response. © 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

2020

The impact of olfactory and wind stimuli on 360 videos using head-mounted displays

Authors
Narciso, D; Melo, M; Vasconcelos Raposo, J; Bessa, M;

Publication
ACM Transactions on Applied Perception

Abstract
Consuming 360 audiovisual content using a Head-Mounted Display (HMD) has become a standard feature for Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR). However, most applications rely only on visual and auditory feedback whereas other senses are often disregarded. The main goal of this work was to study the effect of tactile and olfactory stimuli on participants' sense of presence and cybersickness while watching a 360 video using an HMD-based IVR setup. An experiment with 48 participants and three experimental conditions (360 video, 360 video with olfactory stimulus, and 360 video with tactile stimulus) was performed. Presence and cybersickness were reported via post-test questionnaires. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in presence between the control and the olfactory conditions. From the control to the tactile condition, mean values were higher but failed to show statistical significance. Thus, results suggest that adding an olfactory stimulus increases presence significantly while the addition of a tactile stimulus only shows a positive effect. Regarding cybersickness, no significant differences were found across conditions. We conclude that an olfactory stimulus contributes to higher presence and that a tactile stimulus, delivered in the form of cutaneous perception of wind, has no influence in presence. We further conclude that multisensory cues do not affect cybersickness.

2020

Impact of Different Stimuli on User Stress During a Virtual Firefighting Training Exercise

Authors
Narciso, D; Melo, M; Rodrigues, S; Cunha, JPS; Bessa, M;

Publication
20th IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Bioengineering, BIBE 2020, Cincinnati, OH, USA, October 26-28, 2020

Abstract
Training firefighters using Virtual Reality (VR) technology brings several benefits over traditional training methods including the reduction of costs and risks. The ability of causing the same level of stress as a real situation so that firefighters can learn how to deal with stress was investigated. An experiment aiming to study the influence that additional stimuli (heat, weight, smell and using personal protective equipment-PPE) have on user's stress level while performing a Virtual Environment (VE) designed to train firefighters was developed. Participants' stress and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) were obtained from electrocardiograms recorded during the experiment. The results suggest that wearing the PPE has the largest impact on user's stress level. The results also showed that HRV was able to evidence differences between two phases of the experiment, which suggests that it can be used to monitor users' quantified reaction to VEs. © 2020 IEEE.

2019

Immersive 360° video user experience: impact of different variables in the sense of presence and cybersickness

Authors
Narciso, D; Bessa, M; Melo, M; Coelho, A; Vasconcelos Raposo, J;

Publication
Universal Access in the Information Society

Abstract
Virtual Reality (VR) has been recently gaining interest from researchers and companies, contributing to the development of the associated technologies that aim to transport its users to a virtual environment by the stimulation of their senses. Technologies such as Head-Mounted Displays (HMD), capable of presenting 360° video in 3D, are becoming affordable and, consequently, more common among the average consumer, potentiating the creation of a market for VR experiences. The purpose of this study is to measure the influence of (a) video format (2D/monoscopic vs 3D/stereoscopic), (b) sound format (2D/stereo vs 3D/spatialized), and (c) gender on users’ sense of presence and cybersickness, while experiencing a VR application using an HMD. Presence and cybersickness were measured using questionnaires as subjective measures. Portuguese versions of the Igroup Presence Questionnaire for presence and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire for cybersickness were used. Results revealed no statistically significant differences between (a) VIDEO and (b) SOUND variables on both senses of presence and cybersickness. When paired with (a) VIDEO, the independent variable (c) Gender showed significant differences on almost all subscales of presence. Results suggest that the widely acknowledged differences in spatial ability between genders were a major factor contributing to this outcome. © 2017 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany